Saturday, June 25, 2016

Book Review and a Recipe-Wild About Shortbread


I heard a review of Wild when it came out, thought, That sounds interesting, and forgot about it. When it was made into a movie, I remembered I wanted to read it. Forgot about it again. Recently, I found it on the library shelf.  No avoiding it now.

Cheryl Strayed had an extreme reaction to her mother's death. She set out on a self-destructive path through multiple sex partners and drug use, destroying her marriage in the process.

Making this trip was her way of trying to reconnect with a younger version of herself to save herself. It's amazing she made it through because despite her preparation she was not ready for the rigors she faced.

She faced physical hardship and some dicey situations. She confronted her internal demons and enjoyed the camaraderie of other hikers.

It made me nostalgic for my backpacking days along the Upper Kern River in California. The Pacific Crest Trail passes close to where I camped. Even when I was in my twenties I don't think I would have attempted something like this. Aching shoulders and sore feet for a week is one thing. Having to wrap your blistered, bleeding feet in duct tape and losing toenails is quite another.

This is a great armchair adventure best undertaken with something tasty (not nasty freeze-dried food) and a cup of tea.


Lemon shortbread




1¼ cups unbleached flour ( I like King Arthur. I think it tastes better.)
¼ cup sugar
dash of salt
1 stick butter
grated rind of 1 lemon ( I always buy organic when I use rind.)
1-2 tsp. of lemon juice as needed.

I used a food processor to mix.

Pulse flour, sugar and salt to combine.

Cut butter into 8 pats and drop into flour mixture.

Pulse until mixture looks like large crumbs.

Add lemon juice 1 tsp. at a time just until mixture stays together when you squeeze a bit.

Scrape dough onto a sheet of wax paper and form dough into a log 1½ inches in diameter.

Slice into rounds ¼ inch thick and place rounds on parchment paper-lined baking sheet.

Bake at °350. Check after 20 minutes. Edges should be light golden brown.

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